An integral part of the Trinidad GRS journey is Carol Cometto’s Morning After House — it’s officially a place to recover for a couple of days after surgery until you leave Trinidad, but in reality it’s a key part of mental and physical wellbeing and establishing and maintaining a culture around this amazing experience.

I’m writing separate blog entries about the people I met at the MAH, but suffice to say that their presence — made possible by the guest house — was absolutely crucial for our positive feelings about GRS in Trinidad.

Trinidad Sign

Trinidad Sign

Nestled just below the Trinidad sign, the MAH is a big, sprawling house with approximately 3 apartments with perhaps 6 bedrooms and a variety of common rooms, and it’s in these common spaces that the guests tell stories about how they got here, what surgery was like, what pains they’re having, and what their situation is like back home. You can imagine that such a gathering is nothing like your average group of hotel guests out on the highway Motel 6, and that’s obviously because they’re not here simply to get a night’s rest, but rather because they’re all on a really big journey that takes similar paths through their individual lives to bring them to this point.

Carol
The guest house runs on high octane goodwill provided by Carol Cometto, an italian dynamo who has decorated the house to reflect her sensibilities. She zips around town in a little blue jeep with a New York Yankees spare tire cover on the back with a gusto that’s palpable, waving to her lifelong neighbors, gesturing a variety of gestures to passersby, and generally racing around town to get her business done. When she’s at the MAH, she’s watering plants, checking on guests, orienting new guests, saying farewell to departing guests, showing off her yard-sale acquisitions that make her decor jump to life. She’s your friend and hostess, and she makes you feel at home.

When we arrived, Mary Jo and I stayed downstairs for 1 or 2 days, then moved upstairs, and this is one of the logistical issues Carol spends her time figuring out — how to keep families and friends together while also shifting people around while the patient is in the hospital for 4 days, then minimizing the fatigue when someone returns from the hospital. I suppose some could see this juggling as a hassle, but we found it to be a pleasant experience that put us into a community of other travelers with similar issues.

I have read accounts of GRS in Trinidad that argue one should save money and avoid the MAH as much as possible, but I feel strongly that this would be a short-sighted approach to your Trinidad visit. Sure, you might save a few hundred dollars, but you would lose incredible benefits of getting to see others pursuing the same course as you. Instead of staying in a hotel on the highway before surgery and moving back to that hotel after your 2 free days at the Morning After House, I think you should spend your entire trip to Trinidad at the MAH.

When you arrive, for example, you’re dipping your toes into a stream of other visitors, from those who arrived yesterday and are awaiting surgery to those who have returned from surgery and are preparing to leave. You’ve got a chance to learn from others, to allay your fears, and then, when you return from the hospital, to be a resource for others who have just arrived. The MAH is also a place for spouses and friends to channel their energy and give voice to their fears and expectations.

bricksSymbolic of this stream, this journey, is a very cool idea Carol encourages — while you’re sitting around recovering, you paint a brick taken from the old Trinidad city streets — these bricks are quite thick and have raised “TRINIDAD” lettering on the top. When you’ve painted your brick with a message, a simple color, a collage, or whatever, Carol shellacs it and places it into a wall-walkway, where everyone who follows in your footsteps can see the previous steps taken. I loved looking at the bricks and wished Carol had implemented the idea sooner. Sure, she’s got a map with pins in it and a book of thoughts and a photo album, but this brick walkway is a tangible trace of the steps taken in the Morning After House.

Upon reflection, it seems to me that the Morning After House isn’t so much a guest house; it’s an engine of knowledge exchange. We might think of the MAH in light of the Japanese concept of ba, or “place” or “sphere” in japanese. Ba is essentially a shared space that serves as a foundation for knowledge creation, one that is often defined by a network of interactions. the concept of ba unifies the physical spaces, virtual spaces, and mental spaces involved in knowledge creation.

JoyceCarol

The knowledge created and shared at Morning After House? Nothing less than the experience and the culture around GRS. So if, for some reason, you can’t stay at MAH, I think you ought to go by and hang out as much as possible — because the MAH has ba in spades.