TransLate just hit 50,000 page views (see 20,000, 30,000, and 40,000 for historical context). The period of January 12th to April 12th is 12 weeks, which is the same pace of reading as the previous 10,000 views. Here are some statistics and lists that graphically show the recent trends.

Lower down, I’ll share with you which pages were most popular and what sort of searches people conduct to find the blog.

Here’s a visual look at the blog since its inception, month-by-month. which shows steady, if slow, growth during its first weeks (2008-3 means the 3rd month of 2008), coinciding with a slow coming out process, followed by the high mountains of April (5076 views that month) as I disclosed my transsexual transition plans to everyone, followed by a lull in May and another set of peaks probably coinciding with my facial feminization surgery in late June. There was a little hump of interest in July – September, after which the blog has seen fairly steady volume of between 2000 and 3000 views per month.

Translate Month-by-Month Page Views

Translate Month-by-Month Page Views

And here’s a graph of the week-by-week look, which WordPress picks up in the fall of 2008, illustrating a relatively big summer and a pretty quiet fall — I think everyone got busy with the fall semester and I failed to come up with much interesting to write about. The final data point is nothing to be alarmed about — WordPress just rolled into the next week and started the data collection over.

Week-by-Week since Fall 2008

Week-by-Week since Summer 2008

Finally, just for fun, this third chart is a time-series graph covering just the past 30 days’ of stats, which shows just how variable the author and readers are, separately and together. I think the big spike around mid-March is probably accounted for by my trip to my national conference and the subsequent curiosity about me.

Daily Page Views, most recent 30 days

Daily Page Views, most recent 30 days


What do people read? Here are the top posts for the past 30 days

About, 67
Trans 101, 58
Women’s Responses, 52
Words of Marriage and Union, 45
Marriage, 40
Reflection on My Reflection, 30 (more…)

TransLate just hit 40,000 page views (see 20,000 and 30,000 for historical context). Sept 15th – Jan 11th is 12 weeks, just a hair slower than the last 10,000 views, which took about 10 weeks. The first 10,000 required 5 and a half months, and the second 10,000 took about 10 weeks from mid-April, 2008 through the end of June, 2008. Here are some statistics and lists that graphically show the recent trends.

Lower down, I’ll share with you which pages were most popular and what sort of searches people conduct to find the blog.

Here’s a visual look at the blog since its inception, month-by-month. which shows steady, if slow, growth during its first weeks (2008-3 means the 3rd month of 2008), coinciding with a slow coming out process, followed by the high mountains of April (5076 views that month) as I disclosed my transsexual transition plans to everyone, followed by a lull in May and another set of peaks probably coinciding with my facial feminization surgery in late June. There was a little hump of interest in July – September, after which the blog has seen fairly steady volume of approximately 2600 views per month.

Translate Month-by-Month Page Views

Month-by-Month Page Views

And here’s a graph of the week-by-week look, which WordPress picks up mid-way through 2008, illustrating a relatively big summer and a pretty quiet fall — I think everyone got busy with the fall semester and I failed to come up with much interesting to write about:

TransLate Week-by-Week since Summer 2008

Week-by-Week since Summer 2008

Finally, just for fun, this third chart is a time-series graph covering just the past 30 days’ of stats, which shows just how variable the author and readers are, separately and together. I posted my first blog post in a while on January 4th and I got listed on StumbleUpon January 5th — those two things may account for the weird spike after New Year’s Day:

Daily Page Views, most recent 30 days

Daily Page Views, most recent 30 days


What do people read? Here are the top posts for the past 30 days
2008-12-12 to Today

New Year’s Meme 121
Fire 62
About 53
Trans 101 40
20,000 Pages 26
Marriage 26
Suits Me 20 (more…)

You may recall the blog post on the last day of June about TransLate hitting 20,000 page views since its inception, and I’m happy to tell you that we’ve just hit 30,000 today. This pace is exciting, a full 10,000 views in just about 10 weeks. The first 10,000 required 5 and a half months, and the second 10,000 took about 10 weeks from mid-April, 2008 through the end of June, 2008. You will all get tired of my scribblings, dear readers, and you won’t be able to hide your fatigue, for the stats will tell the tale; however, until that point, I’m happy to keep scribbling, as it helps me process what I’m going through, even as it may speak to you for whatever reason.

Here’s the growth of the blog since its inception, month-by-month. which shows steady, if slow, growth during the blog’s first weeks (2008-3 means the 3rd month of 2008), which coincides with a slow coming out process, followed by the high mountains of April as I disclosed my transsexual transition plans to everyone, followed by a lull in May and another set of peaks probably coinciding with my facial feminization surgery in late June. I cannot account for the relatively flat, moderately high volume of July and August unless it’s just a matter of the blog’s address getting shared around a larger group of family and friends.
Blog Stats (weekly)

Just for fun, this second chart is a time-series graph covering just the past 30 days’ of stats, which shows just how variable the author and readers are, separately and together.

Blog Stats (weekly)

What do people read? Here are the top posts for the past 30 days

2008-08-16 to Today
Title Views

Scenes from Social Security 68
About 67
Trans 101 59
Slade Out 52
Cog and Re-cog 47
Changing the M to F 38
Marriage 33
Lost and Found 33
Surgeonocracy 31 (more…)

TransLate just hit 20,000 page views since its inception. I’m glad the blog serves a purpose for you, dear readers. It has been helpful to me to write about my experiences and I think it has made me a better writer and a better person — imagining you out there, my friends, family, colleagues, total strangers, fellow trans* people, and writing for you as a way of hopefully avoiding dangerous self-centeredness and of assuaging your fears about my situation. I will keep writing as long as you find it useful.

Here’s the growth of the blog since its inception, week-by-week. You read it like this: at the bottom, the legend says 2007-50, which you’d translate to the 50th week of 2007.The first phase of slow growth represents the slow coming out period where we brought one person into the fold every few days. The big spikes in April were the big broadcast announcements to the world. The final few weeks of spikes come from going full-time and blogging the FFS, I suspect.

Blog Stats (weekly)

The rest of this post is simply the past 30 days’ of stats, which I read and find absolutely fascinating.

What do people read? Here are the top posts for the past 30 days
Facing East (part 1) 101
About 54
FFS Day 3, Friday (6/27) 46
Narrative Erasures 41
You Look Good in My Skirt 40
New Swimming Suit 39
Marriage 39
Trans 101 38
Letters 34
FFS Assessment by Alexandra 30
Let’s Take Your Reasoning and Run with i 29 (more…)

In a blog post about transsexuals in the workplace, Anonymous brings up the issue of how education and class privilege thwarts the search for good statistics. In other words, two things are wrong here (and it’s not social justice or anything like that, at least in this post). First, the statistics about various transsexual procedures that we have are not representative of the larger transsexual population, as these procedures are only affordable by those with jobs or disposable income and thus we don’t know anything about transsexuals without jobs or who are poor or uneducated. Second, available role models of successful transsexuals are limited because educated, affluent post-operative transsexuals are not generally willing to participate in surveys or to be trans* their whole lives.

What does this mean? I’m sure socialists would say that this is expected from a free-market medical system and that centralized health care for all would generate not only good healthcare for all transsexuals, but also really solid data. Activists might say that it’s a shame that successful transsexuals tend to fade into society and out of the dual eyes of statistics and role models, thereby depriving society in two ways. I myself do not feel guilty for having the resources to make this transsexual transition, but I feel incredibly lucky to have the funds and the job and the education to make sense of it all. I would probably argue that more information, more education, and more general social acceptance of transness is called for, and we do that best by living well and serving as good, stable role models for others. What do you think, dear readers?